Nuclear Science and Data Bank Publications


Alphabetical list of titles
Actinide and Fission Product Partitioning and Transmutation (2012)
Eleventh Information Exchange Meeting, San Francisco, California, USA, 1-4 November 2010
Burn-up Credit Criticality Safety Benchmark – Phase VII (2012)
UO2 Fuel: Study of Spent Fuel Compositions for Long-term Disposal
Chemical Thermodynamics of Tin (2012)
Chemical Thermodynamics Volume 12
International Evaluation Co-operation (Vol. 33) (2013)
Methods and Issues for the Combined Use of Integral Experiments and Covariance Data (Volume 33)
Introduction of Thorium in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (2015)
Short- to long-term considerations
JEFF 3.1.2 (2012)
Joint Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for Fission and Fusion Applications February 2012
Janis 3.4 (2012)
A Java-based Nuclear Data Display Program
Minor Actinide Burning in Thermal Reactors (2013)
A Report by the Working Party on Scientific Issues of Reactor Systems
Shielding Aspects of Accelerators, Targets and Irradiation Facilities -- SATIF-11 (2013)
Workshop Proceedings, Tsukuba, Japan, 11-13 September 2012
Structural Materials for Innovative Nuclear Systems (SMINS-2) (2012)
Workshop Proceedings, Daejon, Republic of Korea, 31 August-3 September 2010

Detailed publication list

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Handbook on Lead-bismuth Eutectic Alloy and Lead Properties, Materials Compatibility, Thermal-hydraulics and Technologies
English, 954 pages, published: 08/11/15
NEA#7268
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/pubs/2015/7268-lead-bismuth-2015.pdf
Heavy liquid metals such as lead or lead-bismuth have been proposed and investigated as coolants for fast reactors since the 1950s. More recently, there has been renewed interest worldwide in the use of these materials to support the development of systems for the transmutation of radioactive waste. Heavy liquid metals are also under evaluation as a reactor core coolant and accelerator-driven system neutron spallation source. Several national and international R&D programmes are ongoing for the development of liquid lead-alloy technology and the design of liquid-lead alloy-cooled reactor systems.

In 2007, a first edition of the handbook was published to provide deeper insight into the properties and experimental results in relation to lead and lead-bismuth eutectic technology and establish a common database. This handbook remains a reference and is a valuable tool for designers and researchers with an interest in heavy liquid metals.

The 2015 edition includes updated data resulting from various national and international R&D programmes and contains new experimental data to help understand some important phenomena such as liquid metal embrittlement and turbulent heat transfer in a fuel bundle. The handbook provides an overview of liquid lead and lead-bismuth eutectic properties, materials compatibility and testing issues, key aspects of thermal-hydraulics and existing facilities, as well as perspectives for future R&D.
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International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments
English, published: 12/09/15
NEA#7281
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/wpncs/icsbep/handbook.html
The Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (CSBEP) was initiated in October of 1992 by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The project quickly became an international effort as scientists from other interested countries became involved. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) became an official activity of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in 1995.

This handbook contains criticality safety benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments performed at various critical facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by criticality safety engineers to validate calculation techniques used to establish minimum subcritical margins for operations with fissile material and to determine criticality alarm requirements and placement. Many of the specifications are also useful for nuclear data testing. Example calculations are presented; however, these calculations do not constitute a validation of the codes or cross-section data.

The evaluated criticality safety benchmark data are given in nine volumes. These volumes span approximately 69 000 pages and contain 567 evaluations with benchmark specifications for 4 874 critical, near-critical or subcritical configurations, 31 criticality alarm placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 207 configurations that have been categorised as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications.

New to the handbook are benchmark specifications for neutron activation foil and thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements performed at the SILENE critical assembly in Valduc, France as part of a joint venture in 2010 between the US DOE and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). A photograph of this experiment is shown on the front cover.
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International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments
English, published: 05/26/15
NEA#7258
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/wprs/irphe/
International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments

The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation (IRPhE) Project was initiated as a pilot activity in 1999 by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.
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Introduction of Thorium in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle
Short- to long-term considerations
English, 136 pages, published: 06/10/15
NEA#7224
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/pubs/2015/7224-thorium.pdf

Other language(s):
- English: Perspectives on the Use of Thorium in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle – Extended Summary
- Français: Cycle de combustible nucléaire au thorium (TA provisoire) - Synthèse 
Since the beginning of the nuclear era, significant scientific attention has been given to thorium's potential as a nuclear fuel. Although the thorium fuel cycle has never been fully developed, the opportunities and challenges that might arise from the use of thorium in the nuclear fuel cycle are still being studied in many countries and in the context of diverse international programmes around the world. This report provides a scientific assessment of thorium's potential role in nuclear energy both in the short to longer term, addressing diverse options, potential drivers and current impediments to be considered if thorium fuel cycles are to be pursued.
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Perspectives on the Use of Thorium in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle – Extended Summary
English, 20 pages, published: 09/10/15
NEA#7228
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/pubs/2015/7228-thorium-es.pdf

Other language(s):
- English: Introduction of Thorium in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle
- Français: Cycle de combustible nucléaire au thorium (TA provisoire) - Synthèse 
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Review of Integral Experiments for Minor Actinide Management
English, 137 pages, published: 02/06/15
NEA#7222
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/pubs/2015/7222-review-minor-actinide-management.pdf
Spent nuclear fuel contains minor actinides (MAs) such as neptunium, americium and curium, which require careful management. This becomes even more important when mixed oxide (MOX) fuel is being used on a large scale since more MAs will accumulate in the spent fuel. One way to manage these MAs is to transmute them in nuclear reactors, including in light water reactors, fast reactors or accelerator-driven subcritical systems. The transmutation of MAs, however, is not straightforward, as the loading of MAs generally affects physics parameters, such as coolant void, Doppler and burn-up reactivity.

This report focuses on nuclear data requirements for minor actinide management, the review of existing integral data and the determination of required experimental work, the identification of bottlenecks and possible solutions, and the recommendation of an action programme for international co-operation.

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International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments
English, published: 12/15/14
NEA#7231
Volume of the series: Data Bank
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/wpncs/icsbep/handbook.html
The Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (CSBEP) was initiated in October 1992 by the United States Department of Energy. The project quickly became an international effort as scientists from other interested countries became involved. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) became an official activity of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in 1995.

This handbook contains criticality safety benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments performed at various critical facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by criticality safety engineers to validate calculation techniques used to establish minimum subcritical margins for operations with fissile material and to determine criticality alarm requirements and placement. Many of the specifications are also useful for nuclear data testing. Example calculations are presented; however, these calculations do not constitute a validation of the codes or cross-section data.

The evaluated criticality safety benchmark data are given in nine volumes. These volumes span approximately 67?000 pages and contain 561 evaluations with benchmark specifications for 4?839 critical, near-critical or subcritical configurations, 24 criticality alarm placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each and 207?configurations that have been categorised as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications.

New to the handbook are benchmark specifications for subcritical measurements of a nickel-reflected, plutonium-metal sphere performed at the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) by experimenters at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2012. A photograph of this experiment is shown on the front cover.
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State-of-the-art Report on Innovative Fuels for Advanced Nuclear Systems
English, 193 pages, published: 12/12/14
NEA#6895
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/pubs/2014/6895-report-innovative-fuels.pdf
Development of innovative fuels such as homogeneous and heterogeneous fuels, ADS fuels, and oxide, metal, nitride and carbide fuels is an important stage in the implementation process of advanced nuclear systems. Several national and international R&D programmes are investigating minor actinide-bearing fuels due to their ability to help reduce the radiotoxicity of spent fuel and therefore decrease the burden on geological repositories. Minor actinides can be converted into a suitable fuel form for irradiation in reactor systems where they are transmuted into fission products with a significantly shorter half-life.

This report compares recent studies of fuels containing minor actinides for use in advanced nuclear systems. The studies review different fuels for several types of advanced reactors by examining various technical issues associated with fabrication, characterisation, irradiation performance, design and safety criteria, as well as technical maturity.

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Chemical Thermodynamics of Iron, Part I, Volume 13a
English, 1124 pages, published: 12/13/13
NEA#6355
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/dbtdb/pubs/6355-vol13a-iron.pdf
This volume is the 13th in the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) "Chemical Thermodynamics" series. It is the first part of a critical review of the thermodynamic properties of iron, its solid compounds and aqueous complexes, initiated as part of the NEA Thermochemical Database Project Phase III (TDB III). The database system developed at the OECD/NEA Data Bank ensures consistency not only within the recommended data sets of iron, but also among all the data sets published in the series. This volume will be of particular interest to scientists carrying out performance assessments of deep geological disposal sites for radioactive waste.
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International Evaluation Co-operation (Vol. 33)
Methods and Issues for the Combined Use of Integral Experiments and Covariance Data (Volume 33)
English, 178 pages, published: 12/20/13
NEA#7171
Volume of the series: Nuclear Science
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/wpec/volume33/volume33.pdf
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International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (DVD)
March 2013
English, published: 05/13/13
NEA#7140
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/wprs/irphe/irphe-handbook/
The International Reactor Physics Experiments Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was launched in 1999 by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). While co-ordination and administration of the IRPhEP is managed at the international level by the NEA, each participating country is responsible for the administration, technical direction and priorities of the project within their respective countries. The information and data included in this handbook are available to NEA member countries, to all contributing countries and to others on a case-by-case basis.
This handbook contains reactor physics benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments performed at various nuclear facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by reactor designers, safety analysts and nuclear data evaluators to validate calculation techniques and data. Example calculations are presented; they do not, however, constitute validation or endorsement of the codes or cross-section data.
The 2013 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments contains data from 130 experimental series performed at 47 reactor facilities. One hundred twenty-six of the 130 evaluations are published as approved benchmarks; the remaining four are published as draft documents only.
New to the handbook are benchmark specifications for selected measurements on the very-high-temperature reactor critical assembly (VHTRC) which were performed at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) Tokai Research Establishment in Japan between 1985 and 1996.
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Minor Actinide Burning in Thermal Reactors
A Report by the Working Party on Scientific Issues of Reactor Systems
English, 82 pages, published: 11/18/13
NEA#6997
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/pubs/2013/6997-minor-actinide.pdf
This publication provides an introduction to minor actinide nuclear properties and discusses some of the arguments in favour of minor actinide recycling, as well as the potential role of thermal reactors in this regard. Various technical issues and challenges are examined from the fuel cycle, operations, fuel designs, core management and safety/dynamics responses to safety and economics. The focus of this report is on the general conclusions of recent research that could be applied to thermal reactors. Further research and development needs are also considered, with summaries of findings and recommendations for the direction of future R&D efforts.
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Shielding Aspects of Accelerators, Targets and Irradiation Facilities -- SATIF-11
Workshop Proceedings, Tsukuba, Japan, 11-13 September 2012
English, 202 pages, published: 10/08/13
NEA#7157
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/pubs/2013/7157-satif-11.pdf
Particle accelerators have evolved over the last decades from simple devices to powerful machines, and are having an increasingly important impact on research, technology and daily life. Today they have a wide range of applications in many areas including material science and medical applications. In recent years, new technological and research applications have helped to define requirements while the number of accelerator facilities in operation, being commissioned, designed or planned has grown significantly. Their parameters, which include the beam energy, currents and intensities, and target composition, can vary widely, giving rise to new radiation shielding aspects and problems.
Particle accelerators must be operated in safe ways to protect operators, the public and the environment. As the design and use of these facilities evolve, so must the analytical methods used in the safety analyses. These workshop proceedings review the state of the art in radiation shielding of accelerator facilities and irradiation targets. They also evaluate progress in the development of modelling methods used to assess the effectiveness of such shielding as part of safety analyses.
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Status Report on Structural Materials for Advanced Nuclear Systems
English, 107 pages, published: 10/21/13
NEA#6409
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/pubs/2013/6409-sr-smans.pdf
Materials performance is critical to the safe and economic operation of any nuclear system. As the international community pursues the development of Generation IV reactor concepts and accelerator-driven transmutation systems, it will be increasingly necessary to develop advanced materials capable of tolerating the more challenging environments of these new systems. The international community supports numerous materials research programmes, with each country determining its individual focus on a case-by-case basis. In many instances, similar alloys of materials systems are being studied in several countries, providing the opportunity for collaborative and cross-cutting research that benefits different systems.

This report is a snapshot of the current materials programmes supporting the development of advanced concepts. The descriptions of the research are grouped by concept, and national programmes are described within each concept. The report provides an overall sense of the importance of materials research worldwide and the opportunities for synergy among the countries represented in this overview.
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Validation of the JEFF-3.1 Nuclear Data Library
JEFF Report 23
English, 76 pages, published: 02/14/13
NEA#7079
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/dbdata/nds_jefreports/jefreport-23/nea7079-jeff23.pdf
The Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion (JEFF) Project is a collaborative effort among OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank member countries to develop a reference nuclear data library for use in different energy applications. These data can be used to help improve the safety and economy of existing installations, as well as to design advanced nuclear reactors and their associated fuel cycles, including radioactive waste management. The JEFF-3.1 library contains several different data types, including neutron and proton interaction data, neutron activation data, radioactive decay data, fission yield data and thermal scattering data. This report describes the initial validation of the complete JEFF-3.1 library for thermal reactors, fuel cycle, storage and reprocessing, fusion technology and intermediate energy applications. It will be useful for scientists and engineers in national laboratories, universities and industry who use basic nuclear data, and is particularly suitable for those who work with application libraries based on JEFF-3.1.

The JEF/DOC and EFFDOC working documents cited in the report are available online at www.oecd-nea.org/dbdata/nds_jefreports/jefreport-23/.

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Actinide and Fission Product Partitioning and Transmutation
Eleventh Information Exchange Meeting, San Francisco, California, USA, 1-4 November 2010
English, 404 pages, published: 06/01/12
NEA#6996, ISBN: 978-92-64-99174-3
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/reports/2012/nea6996-11thPandT.pdf
In order to provide experts with a forum to present and discuss developments in the field of partitioning and transmutation (P&T), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has been organising, since 1990, a series of biennial information exchange meetings on actinide and fission product P&T.

These proceedings contain all the technical papers presented at the 11th Information Exchange Meeting, which was held on 1-4 November 2010 in San Francisco, California, USA. The meeting covered national programmes on P&T; fuel cycle strategies and transition scenarios; waste forms and geological disposal; transmutation fuels and targets; pyro and aqueous processes; transmutation physics and materials; and transmutation system design, performance and safety.
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Burn-up Credit Criticality Safety Benchmark – Phase VII
UO2 Fuel: Study of Spent Fuel Compositions for Long-term Disposal
English, 180 pages, published: 02/21/12
NEA#6998, ISBN: 978-92-64-99172-9
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/docs/2012/burn-up-credit-phaseVII.pdf
After spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is discharged from a nuclear reactor, fuel composition and reactivity continue to vary as a function of time due to the decay of unstable nuclides. Accurate predictions of the concentrations of long-lived radionuclides in SNF, which represent a significant potential hazard to human beings and to the environment over a very long period, are particularly necessary for radiological dose assessments.
This report assesses the ability of existing computer codes and associated nuclear data to predict isotopic compositions and their corresponding neutron multiplication factor (keff) values for pressurised-water-reactor (PWR) UO2 fuel at 50 GWd/MTU burn-up in a generic spent fuel cask configuration. Fuel decay compositions and keff values have been calculated for 30 post-irradiation time steps out to one million years.
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Chemical Thermodynamics of Tin
Chemical Thermodynamics Volume 12
English, 644 pages, published: 12/31/12
NEA#6354, ISBN: 978-92-64-99206-1
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/dbtdb/pubs/tin.pdf
This volume is the 12th in the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) "Chemical Thermodynamics" series. It is based on a critical review of the thermodynamic properties of tin, its solid compounds and aqueous complexes, carried out as part of the NEA Thermochemical Database Project Phase III (TDB III). The database system developed at the OECD/NEA Data Bank ensures consistency not only within the recommended data sets of tin, but also among all the data sets published in the series. This volume will be of particular interest to scientists carrying out performance assessments of deep geological disposal sites for radioactive waste.
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Homogeneous versus Heterogeneous Recycling of Transuranics in Fast Nuclear Reactors
English, 92 pages, published: 12/31/12
NEA#7077, ISBN: 978-92-64-99177-4
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/docs/2012/7077-hvh-recycling-transuranics-fnr.pdf
Fuel transuranics (TRU) multi-recycling is a mandatory feature if both the resource sustainability and the waste minimisation objectives for future fuel cycles are to be pursued. The resulting TRU transmutation can be implemented in fast neutron spectrum reactors according to two main options commonly referred to as the homogeneous and heterogeneous modes.

In this study, the two alternatives have been compared in terms of reactor core feasibility, fuel development and impact on the fuel cycle. The multi-criteria analysis indicates that there are major challenges in minor actinide-loaded fuel development, its experimental validation and possibly in its reprocessing. Both modes of recycling have an impact on the overall fuel cycle, even if at different stages, for example complex target fabrication and handling in the case of heterogeneous recycling and full core fuel fabrication in the case of homogeneous recycling. The study finds that an economic evaluation according to specific implementation scenarios should still be undertaken.
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International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments
September 2011
English, published: 03/26/12
NEA#7038, ISBN: 978-92-64-99163-7
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/wpncs/icsbep/handbook.html
The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), originally initiated at the national level by the US Department of Energy in 1992, became an official activity of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in 1995.

This handbook contains criticality safety benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments performed at various critical facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by criticality safety engineers to validate calculation techniques used to establish minimum subcritical margins for operations with fissile material and to determine criticality alarm requirement and placement. Many of the specifications are also useful for nuclear data testing. Example calculations are presented; these calculations do not, however, constitute a validation of the codes or cross-section data.

The evaluated criticality safety benchmark data are presented in nine volumes, containing over 58 000 pages and 533 evaluations with benchmark specifications for 4 552 critical, near-critical or subcritical configurations, 24 criticality alarm placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 200 configurations that have been categorised as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications.

New to the handbook are benchmark specifications for the GROTESQUE: Complex Geometric Arrangement of Unreflected HEU (93.15) Metal Pieces experiment (see front cover) that was performed by John T. Mihalczo at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiment Facility in June 1964.
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International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (DVD)
English, published: 12/31/12
NEA#7080, ISBN: 978-92-64-99192-7
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/wpncs/icsbep/handbook.html
The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), originally initiated at the national level by the US Department of Energy in 1992, became an official activity of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in 1995.
This handbook contains criticality safety benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments performed at various critical facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by criticality safety engineers to validate calculation techniques used to establish minimum subcritical margins for operations with fissile material and to determine criticality alarm requirement and placement. Many of the specifications are also useful for nuclear data testing. Example calculations are presented; these calculations do not, however, constitute a validation of the codes or cross-section data.
The evaluated criticality safety benchmark data are presented in nine volumes, containing over 65 000 pages and 549 evaluations with benchmark specifications for over 4 700 critical, near-critical or subcritical configurations, 24 criticality alarm placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 200 configurations that have been categorised as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications.
New to the handbook are benchmark specifications for the Water-moderated Square-pitched U(6.90)O2 Fuel Rod Lattices with 0.67 Fuel-to-water Ratio experiments (see front cover) that were performed by a team of experimenters at Sandia National Laboratories between 2009 and 2012.
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International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (DVD)
English, published: 05/15/12
NEA#7081, ISBN: 978-92-64-99168-2
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/wprs/irphe/irphe-handbook/handbook.html
The International Reactor Physics Experiments Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was launched in 1999 by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). While co-ordination and administration of the IRPhEP is managed at the international level by the NEA, each participating country is responsible for the administration, technical direction and priorities of the project within their respective countries. The information and data included in this handbook are available to NEA member countries, to all contributing countries and to others on a case-by-case basis.

This handbook contains reactor physics benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments performed at various nuclear facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by reactor designers, safety analysts and nuclear data evaluators to validate calculation techniques and data. Example calculations are presented; they do not, however, constitute validation or endorsement of the codes or cross-section data.

The 2012 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments contains data from 56 experimental series performed at 32 reactor facilities. Fifty-four of the 56 evaluations are published as approved benchmarks; the remaining two are published as draft documents only.

New to the handbook are benchmark specifications for selected configurations from the HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program which were performed at the Paul Scherrer Institute’s PROTEUS zero-power research reactor in Villigen, Switzerland between 1992 and 1996.
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JEFF 3.1.2
Joint Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for Fission and Fusion Applications February 2012
English, published: 04/19/12
NEA#7111
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/dbdata/jeff
The Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion File is an evaluated library produced through international collaboration among Data Bank member countries co-ordinated by the NEA Data Bank. As of February 2012, JEFF 3.1.2 is the latest update of the general purpose neutron data library.

This DVD contains:
• General purpose incident neutron data in ENDF-6 and ACE formats
• Activation data
• Thermal scattering data
• Incident proton data
• Radioactive decay data
• Neutron-induced fission yields data
• Spontaneous fission yields data
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Janis 3.4
A Java-based Nuclear Data Display Program
English, published: 08/21/12
NEA#7116
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/tools/abstract/detail/nea-1760/
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Structural Materials for Innovative Nuclear Systems (SMINS-2)
Workshop Proceedings, Daejon, Republic of Korea, 31 August-3 September 2010
English, 444 pages, published: 12/31/12
NEA#6896, ISBN: 978-92-64-99209-2
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/docs/2012/6896-smins-korea-proceedings.pdf
Materials research is a field of growing relevance for innovative nuclear systems, such as Generation IV reactors, critical and sub-critical transmutation systems and fusion devices. For these different systems, structural materials are selected or developed taking into account the specificities of their foreseen operational environment. Since 2007, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has begun organising a series of workshops on Structural Materials for Innovative Nuclear Systems (SMINS) in order to provide a forum to exchange information on current materials research programmes for different innovative nuclear systems. These proceedings include the papers of the second workshop (SMINS-2) which was held in Daejon, Republic of Korea on 31 August-3 September 2010, and hosted by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI).

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Potential Benefits and Impacts of Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles with Actinide Partitioning and Transmutation
English, 74 pages, published: 09/29/11
NEA#6894, ISBN: 978-92-64-99165-1
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/reports/2011/6894-benefits-impacts-advanced-fuel.pdf
This report provides a comparative analysis of different studies performed to assess the potential impact of partitioning and transmutation (P&T) on different types of geological repositories for radioactive waste in various licensing and regulatory environments. Criteria, metrics and impact measures have been analysed and compared with the goal of providing an objective comparison of the state of the art to help shape decisions on options for future advanced fuel cycles.
P&T allows a reduction of the inventory of the emplaced materials which can have a significant impact on the repository. Such a reduction can also make the uncertainty about repository performance less important both during normal evolution and in the case of disruptive scenarios. While P&T will never replace the need for waste repositories, it has the potential to significantly improve public perception regarding the ability to effectively manage radioactive waste by largely reducing the transuranic (TRU) waste masses to be stored and, consequently, to improve public acceptance of the geological repositories. Both issues are important for the future sustainability of nuclear power.