Recent Publications


Alphabetical list of titles
Experience from the Fifth International Nuclear Emergency Exercise (INEX-5) (2018)
Notification, Communication and Interfaces Related to Catastrophic Events Involving Ionising Radiation and/or Radioactive Materials
NEA brochure (2018)
(Chinese version - 经合组织核能署)
Nuclear Power Plant Operating Experience (2018)
from the IAEA/NEA International Reporting System for Operating Experience 2012–2014

Detailed publication list

2018 | page top

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2018 NEA International Mentoring Workshops
English, 16 pages, published: 10/23/18
NEA#7454
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/hans/pubs/2018/7454-mentoring-workshops-2018.pdf
The NEA mentoring workshops are in line with the initiatives being undertaken by countries around the world to ensure that expertise is maintained in highly technical areas such as nuclear safety, radiological protection and other critical disciplines. Capacity-building efforts focusing on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields need to be sustained and reinforced – particularly those aimed at young women, who are significantly under-represented in many areas. It is in this spirit that the NEA partnered with Japan’s National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST) in 2017 to organise its first International Mentoring Workshop in Science and Engineering, on 25-26 July 2017 in Chiba, Japan. The success of this first workshop has led to the organisation of two additional workshops in 2018, both of which are introduced in this brochure – one in Tokyo, Japan, and the other in Ávila, Spain. These workshops are a clear manifestation of the NEA’s commitment to maintaining, and further strengthening, its momentum in encouraging a future generation of female leaders in science and engineering fields.
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Brochure AEN
Français, published: 09/12/18
NEA#7440
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/pub/aen-bref.pdf
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Bulletin de droit nucléaire n° 94 - Volume 2/2014
Français, published: 11/20/18
NEA#7184
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/law/nlbfr/nlb94-fr.pdf

Other language(s):
- English: Nuclear Law Bulletin No. 94 
Le Bulletin de droit nucleaire est une publication internationale unique en son genre destinee aux juristes et aux universitaires en droit nucleaire. Ses lecteurs beneficient d?informations exhaustives qui font autorite sur les developpements qui touchent ce droit. Publie gratuitement en ligne deux fois par an, en anglais et en francais, il propose des articles thematiques rediges par des experts juridiques renommes, rend compte du developpement des legislations a travers le monde et presente la jurisprudence et les accords bilateraux et multilateraux pertinents ainsi que les activites reglementaires des organisations internationales.

Ce numero inclut notamment les articles suivants : « Faciliter l'entree en vigueur et la mise en oeuvre de l'amendement de la Convention sur la protection physique des matières nucléaires : observations, enjeux et bénéfices » ; « La situation juridique de l'énergie nucléaire en Allemagne » ; « Défis pour l'industrie de l'assurance après la modernisation du régime international de responsabilité civile nucléaire » ; « Projet de loi fédérale de la Fédération de Russie « La responsabilité civile pour dommages nucléaires et sa garantie financière »
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Country-Specific Safety Culture Forum: Sweden
English, published: 09/13/18
NEA#7420
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/hans/pubs/2018/7420-cssc-sweden.pdf

Other language(s):
- Swedish: Swedish version of Country-Specific Safety Culture Forum: Sweden
One of the many important lessons learnt about nuclear safety over the years has been that
human aspects of nuclear safety are as important as any technical issue that may arise in
the course of nuclear operations. The international nuclear community can work together to
identify and address issues associated with components and systems and compare operational
experiences, but identifying how human behaviour affects safety and the best approaches to
examine this behaviour from country to country remains less common.
Practical experience has nevertheless shown that there are important differences in how people
work together and communicate across borders. People’s behaviours, attitudes and values
do not stop at the gate of a nuclear installation, and awareness of the systemic nature of
culture and its deeper aspects, such as the dynamics of how values and assumptions influence
behaviours, continues to evolve.
The NEA safety culture forum was created to gain a better understanding of how the national
context affects safety culture in a given country and how operators and regulators perceive
these effects in their day-to-day activities. The ultimate goal is to ensure safe nuclear operations.
The first NEA safety culture forum – a collaborative effort between the Nuclear Energy Agency
(NEA), the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) and the Swedish Radiation Safety
Authority (SSM) – was held in Sweden in early 2018. This report outlines the process used to
conduct the forum, reveals findings from the discussions and invites the nuclear community to
further reflect and take action.
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Experience from the Fifth International Nuclear Emergency Exercise (INEX-5)
Notification, Communication and Interfaces Related to Catastrophic Events Involving Ionising Radiation and/or Radioactive Materials
English, published: 09/07/18
NEA#7379
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/rp/pubs/2018/7379-inex-5.pdf
The NEA has a long tradition of expertise in the area of nuclear emergency policy, planning, preparedness and management. Through its activities in this field, it offers member countries unbiased assistance on nuclear preparedness matters, with a view to facilitating improvements in nuclear emergency preparedness strategies and response at the international level. A central approach to this has been the preparation and conduct of the International Nuclear Emergency Exercise (INEX) series.
The Fifth International Nuclear Emergency Exercise (INEX-5) was developed specifically in response to member countries' desire to test and demonstrate the value of changes put in place following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. Exercise objectives focused on notification, communication and interfaces related to catastrophic events involving ionising radiation and/or radioactive material. The exercise was held during 2015 and 2016, with 22 countries participating in the exercise.
This report summarises the major evaluation outcomes of the national and regional exercises, policy level outcomes, recommendations and follow-up activities emerging from INEX-5 and the discussions at the INEX-5 International Workshop. A set of key needs were identified in areas such as real-time communication and information sharing among countries and international partners, improving cross-border and international co-ordination of protective measures and considering the mental health impacts on populations when implementing protective measures.
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International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments – DVD
English, published: 12/21/18
NEA#7360
Free on web
The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook contains criticality safety benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments that were performed at various critical facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by criticality and safety analysts as well as nuclear data evaluators to validate calculational techniques and data. The handbook is produced by the ICSBEP working group, under the aegis of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). While co-ordination and administration of the ICSBEP is undertaken by the NEA, each participating country is responsible for the administration, technical direction, and priorities of the project within their respective countries. Access to some of the information and data included in this handbook may be restricted; full conditions for access are available on the NEA website.
The 2018 edition contains data evaluated criticality safety benchmark data in nine volumes that span over 70 000 pages. The handbook contains 567 evaluations with benchmark specifications for 4 916 critical, near-critical or subcritical configurations, 45 criticality alarm placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 215 configurations that have been categorised as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications.
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International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments – DVD
English, published: 12/21/18
NEA#7361
Free on web
The International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Experiments contains reactor physics benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments that were performed at various nuclear facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by reactor designers, safety analysts and nuclear data evaluators to validate calculational techniques and data. The handbook is a product of the International Reactor Physics Evaluation (IRPhE) project, conducted by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). While co-ordination and administration of the IRPhE project is undertaken by the NEA, each participating country is responsible for the administration, technical direction, and priorities of the project within their respective countries. Access to some of the information and data included in this handbook may be restricted; full conditions for access are available on the NEA website.
The 2018 edition contains data from 159 different experimental series that were performed at 54 different nuclear facilities. Some 156 of the 159 evaluations are published as approved benchmarks. The remaining five evaluations are published as draft documents only. All draft documents were reviewed by the International Reactor Physics Evaluation (IRPhE) Technical Review Group (TRG). Example calculations are presented; however, these calculations do not constitute validation or endorsement of the codes or cross section data. The IRPhE project is patterned after the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and is closely co-ordinated with the ICSBEP. Some benchmark data are applicable to both nuclear criticality safety and reactor physics technology. Some have already been evaluated and published by the ICSBEP, but have been extended to include other types of measurements besides the critical configuration.
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Measuring Employment Generated by the Nuclear Power Sector
English, published: 10/25/18
NEA#7204
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/ndd/pubs/2018/7204-employment-nps.pdf
The nuclear energy sector employs a considerable workforce around the world, and with nuclear power projected to grow in countries with increasing electricity demand, corresponding jobs in the nuclear power sector will also grow. Using the most available macroeconomic model to determine total employment – the "input/output" model – the Nuclear Energy Agency and International Atomic Energy Agency collaborated to measure direct, indirect and induced employment from the nuclear power sector in a national economy. The results indicate that direct employment during site preparation and construction of a single unit 1 000 megawatt-electric advanced light water reactor at any point in time for 10 years is approximately 1 200 professional and construction staff, or about 12 000 labour years. For 50 years of operation, approximately 600 administrative, operation and maintenance, and permanently contracted staff are employed annually, or about 30 000 labour years. For up to 10 years of decommissioning, about 500 people are employed annually, or around 5 000 labour years. Finally, over an approximate period of 40 years, close to 80 employees are managing nuclear waste, totalling around 3 000 labour years. A total of about 50 000 direct labour-years per gigawatt. Direct expenditures on these employees and equipment generate approximately the same number of indirect employment, or about 50 000 labour years; and direct and indirect expenditures generate about the same number of induced employment, or 100 000 labour years. Total employment in the nuclear power sector of a given national economy is therefore roughly 200 000 labour years over the life cycle of a gigawatt of nuclear generating capacity.
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Metadata for Radioactive Waste Management
English, published: 12/10/18
NEA#7378
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/rwm/pubs/2018/7378-metadata-rwm.pdf
National programmes for radioactive waste management require very large amounts of data and information across multiple and disparate disciplines. These programmes tend to run over a period of many decades resulting in a serious risk of data and information loss, which in turn can threaten the production and maintenance of robust safety cases.

Metadata and associated tools and techniques play a crucial role in modern data and information management. The Radioactive Waste Repository Metadata Management (RepMet) initiative has prepared the first international study on the application of metadata to the field of radioactive waste management. This report introduces the concept of metadata, explains how metadata can help to facilitate data management, and gives advice on the issues arising when developing metadata within radioactive waste management programmes. It is aimed at readers looking to obtain a highlevel overview of metadata, and associated tools and techniques, and the strategic importance they can play in Radioactive Waste Management Organisations (RWMOs).
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NEA brochure
English, 8 pages, published: 09/10/18
NEA#7139
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/pub/nea-brochure.pdf
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NEA brochure
(Chinese version - 经合组织核能署)
Chinese, published: 09/12/18
NEA#7447
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/pub/nea-brief-ch.pdf
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Nuclear Energy Data 2018
English, published: 12/14/18
NEA#7416
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/ndd/pubs/2018/7416-ned-2018.pdf
Nuclear Energy Data is the Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports documenting nuclear power status in NEA member countries and in the OECD area. Information provided by governments includes statistics on total electricity produced by all sources and by nuclear power, fuel cycle capacities and requirements, and projections to 2035, where available. Country reports summarise energy policies, updates of the status in nuclear energy programmes and fuel cycle developments. In 2017, nuclear power continued to supply significant amounts of low-carbon baseload electricity, in a context of strong competition from low-cost fossil fuels and renewable energy sources. Governments committed to having nuclear power in the energy mix advanced plans for developing or increasing nuclear generating capacity, with the preparation of new build projects making progress in Finland, Hungary, Turkey and the United Kingdom. Further details on these and other developments are provided in the publication's numerous tables, graphs and country reports.

This publication contains "StatLinks". For each StatLink, the reader will find a URL which leads them to the corresponding spreadsheet.

Les Donnees sur l'energie nucleaire, compilation annuelle de statistiques et de rapports nationaux preparee par l'Agence de l'OCDE pour l'energie nucleaire, presentent la situation de l'energie nucleaire dans les pays membres de l'AEN et dans la zone de l'OCDE. Les informations communiquees par les gouvernements comprennent des statistiques sur la production d'electricite totale et nucleaire, les capacites et les besoins du cycle du combustible et, lorsqu'elles sont disponibles, des projections jusqu'en 2035. Les rapports nationaux presentent brievement les politiques energetiques, la situation des programmes electronucleaires et ceux du cycle du combustible. En 2017, l'energie nucleaire a continue de fournir des quantites importantes d'electricite en base faiblement carbonee, et ce dans un contexte de forte concurrence avec les combustibles fossiles bon marche et les energies renouvelables. Les pays decides a inclure ou conserver le nucleaire dans leur bouquet energetique ont poursuivi leurs projets de deploiement ou d'augmentation de leur puissance nucleaire installee. Ainsi, des projets de construction progressent en Finlande, en Hongrie, au Royaume-Uni et en Turquie. De plus amples informations sur ces evolutions et d'autres developpements sont fournies dans les nombreux tableaux, graphiques et rapports nationaux que contient cet ouvrage.

Cette publication contient des < StatLinks >. Fonctionnant comme un lien internet, un StatLink fournit l'acces a la feuille de calcul correspondante.
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Nuclear Power Plant Operating Experience
from the IAEA/NEA International Reporting System for Operating Experience 2012–2014
English, published: 09/19/18
NEA#7448
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/nsd/pubs/2018/7448-iaea-nea-irs-2012-2014.pdf
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Proceedings of the Fifth International Nuclear Emergency Exercise (INEX-5) Workshop
English, published: 10/02/18
NEA#7442
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/rp/pubs/2018/7442-inex-5-proceedings.pdf
The Fifth International Nuclear Emergency Exercise (INEX-5) was developed in response to NEA member countries' desire to test and demonstrate the value of changes put in place following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. INEX-5 was held during 2015 and 2016, and was followed by the Fifth International Nuclear Emergency Exercise (INEX-5) Workshop in early 2017. Representatives from 22 member countries, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the European Commission attended the workshop, where participants identified elements emerging from INEX-5 that would help improve international and national arrangements for notification, communication and interfaces related to catastrophic events involving radiation or radiological materials.
The workshop was an interactive experience structured around invited presentations, moderated discussions and breakout groups that addressed the four broad topics of communication and information sharing with other countries and international partners; cross-border and international co-ordination of protective actions; mid- and long-term aspects of recovery; and connections with the work of other international organisations and networks. These proceedings provide a summary of the proposals and recommendations for future work in emergency management.
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State-of-the-Art Report on Light Water Reactor Accident-Tolerant Fuels
English, published: 09/28/18
NEA#7317
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/pubs/2018/7317-accident-tolerant-fuels-2018.pdf

Other language(s):
- English: Executive Summary of State-of-the-Art Report on Light Water Reactor Accident-Tolerant Fuels 
As part of a broader spectrum of collaborative activities underpinning nuclear materials research, the Nuclear Energy Agency is supporting worldwide efforts towards the development of advanced materials, including fuels for partitioning and transmutation purposes and accident-tolerant fuels (ATFs). This state-of-the-art report on ATFs results from the collective work of experts from 35 institutions in 14 NEA member countries, alongside invited technical experts from the People's Republic of China. It represents a shared and consensual position, based on expert judgment, concerning the scientific and technological knowledge related to ATFs. The report reviews available information on the most promising fuels and cladding concepts in terms of properties, experimental data and modelling results, as well as ongoing research and development activities. It also includes a description of illustrative accident scenarios that may be adopted to assess the potential performance enhancement of ATFs relative to the current standard fuel systems in accident conditions, a definition of the technology readiness levels applicable to ATFs, a survey of available modelling and simulation tools (fuel performance and severe accident analysis codes), and the experimental facilities available to support the development of ATF concepts. The information included in this report will be useful for national programmes and industrial stakeholders as an input to setting priorities, and helping them to choose the most appropriate technology based on their specific strategy, business case and deployment schedules.
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Swedish version of Country-Specific Safety Culture Forum: Sweden
Swedish, published: 09/13/18
NEA#7445
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/hans/pubs/2018/7445-cssc-sweden-sv.pdf

Other language(s):
- English: Country-Specific Safety Culture Forum: Sweden
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The Full Costs of Electricity Provision - Extended Summary
English, published: 10/29/18
NEA#7437
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/ndd/pubs/2018/7437-full-costs-sum-2018.pdf

Other language(s):
- English: The Full Costs of Electricity Provision 
- English: The Full Costs of Electricity Provision - Policy Brief 
Electricity provision touches upon every facet of life in OECD and non-OECD countries alike, and choosing how this electricity is generated ? whether from fossil fuels, nuclear energy or renewables ? affects not only economic outcomes but individual and social well-being in the broader sense. Research on the overall costs of electricity is an ongoing effort, as only certain costs of electricity provision are perceived directly by producers and consumers. Other costs, such as the health impacts of air pollution, damage from climate change or the effects on the electricity system of small-scale variable production are not reflected in market prices and thus diminish well-being in unaccounted for ways.

Accounting for these social costs in order to establish the full costs of electricity provision is difficult, yet such costs are too important to be disregarded in the context of the energy transitions currently under way in OECD and NEA countries. This report draws on evidence from a large number of studies concerning the social costs of electricity and identifies proven instruments for internalising them so as to improve overall welfare.

The results outlined in the report should lead to new and more comprehensive research on the full costs of electricity, which in turn would allow policy makers and the public to make better informed decisions along the path towards fully sustainable electricity systems.
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Uranium 2018: Resources, Production and Demand
English, published: 12/13/18
NEA#7413
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/ndd/pubs/2018/7413-uranium-2018.pdf
Uranium is the raw material used to produce fuel for long-lived nuclear power facilities, necessary for the generation of significant amounts of baseload low-carbon electricity for decades to come. Although a valuable commodity, declining market prices for uranium in recent years, driven by uncertainties concerning the evolution in the use of nuclear power, have led to significant production cutbacks and the postponement of mine development plans in a number of countries and to some questions being raised about future uranium supply.

This 27th edition of the "Red Book", a recognised world reference on uranium jointly prepared by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), provides analyses and information from 41 producing and consuming countries in order to address these and other questions. The present edition provides the most recent review of world uranium market fundamentals and presents data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It offers updated information on established uranium production centres and mine development plans, as well as projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related requirements through 2035, in order to address long-term uranium supply and demand issues.