Recent Publications


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Detailed publication list

2018 | 2017 | page top

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The Full Costs of Electricity Provision
English, 212 pages, published: 04/13/18
NEA#7298
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/ndd/pubs/2018/7298-full-costs-2018.pdf

Other language(s):
- English: Extended Summary of Full Costs of Electricity Provision 
- English: Executive Summary of The Full Costs of Electricity Provision 
Electricity provision touches upon every facet of life in OECD and non-OECD countries alike, and choosing how this electricity is generated - whether from fossil fuels, nuclear energy or renewables - affects not only economic outcomes but individual and social well-being in the broader sense. Research on the overall costs of electricity is an ongoing effort, as only certain costs of electricity provision are perceived directly by producers and consumers. Other costs, such as the health impacts of air pollution, damage from climate change or the effects on the electricity system of small-scale variable production are not reflected in market prices and thus diminish well-being in unaccounted for ways.

Accounting for these social costs in order to establish the full costs of electricity provision is difficult, yet such costs are too important to be disregarded in the context of the energy transitions currently under way in OECD and NEA countries. This report draws on evidence from a large number of studies concerning the social costs of electricity and identifies proven instruments for internalising them so as to improve overall welfare.

The results outlined in the report should lead to new and more comprehensive research on the full costs of electricity, which in turn would allow policy makers and the public to make better informed decisions along the path towards fully sustainable electricity systems.
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State-of-the-art Report on the Progress on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Chemistry
English, 291 pages, published: 03/19/18
NEA#7267
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/pubs/2018/7267-soar.pdf
The implementation of advanced nuclear systems requires that new technologies associated with the back end of the fuel cycle are developed. The separation of minor actinides from other fuel components is one of the advanced concepts being studied to help close the nuclear fuel cycle and to improve the long term effects on the performance of geological repositories. Separating spent fuel elements and subsequently converting them through transmutation into short lived nuclides should considerably reduce the long-term risks associated with nuclear power generation.

R&D programmes worldwide are attempting to address such challenges, and many processes for advanced reprocessing and partitioning minor actinides are being developed. This report provides a comprehensive overview of progress on separation chemistry processes, and in particular on the technologies associated with the separation and recovery of minor actinides for recycling so as to help move towards the implementation of advanced fuel cycles. The report examines both aqueous and pyro processes, as well as the status of current and proposed technologies described according to the hierarchy of separations targeting different fuel components. The process criteria that will affect technology down selection are also reviewed, as are non proliferation requirements. The maturity of different reprocessing techniques are assessed using a scale based on the technology readiness level, and perspectives for future R&D are reviewed.
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Executive Summary of Towards an All-Hazards Approach to Emergency Preparedness and Response
English, published: 02/26/18
NEA#7436
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/rp/pubs/2018/7436-all-hazards-epr-es.pdf
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Towards an All-Hazards Approach to Emergency Preparedness and Response
Lessons Learnt from Non-Nuclear Events
English, published: 01/12/18
NEA#7308
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/rp/pubs/2018/7308-all-hazards-epr.pdf
The field of emergency management is broad, complex and dynamic. In the post-Fukushima context, emergency
preparedness and response (EPR) in the nuclear sector is more than ever being seen as part of a broader
framework. The OECD has recommended that its members ?establish and promote a comprehensive, all-hazards
and transboundary approach to country risk governance to serve as the foundation for enhancing
national resilience and responsiveness?. In order to achieve such an all-hazards approach to emergency
management, a major step in the process will be to consider experiences from the emergency management of
hazards emanating from a variety of sectors.

The NEA Working Party on Nuclear Emergency Matters (WPNEM) joined forces with the OECD Working Group
on Chemical Accidents (WGCA), the OECD Public Governance and Territorial Development Directorate?s High-
Level Risk Forum (HLRF) and the European Commission?s Joint Research Centre (JRC) to collaborate on this
report, which demonstrates similarities between emergency planning and preparedness across sectors, and
identifies lessons learnt and good practices in diverse areas for the benefit of the international community.
A set of expert contributions, enriched with a broad range of national experiences, are presented in the
report to take into account expertise gathered from the emergency management of hazards other than those
emanating from the nuclear sector in an effort to support and foster an all-hazards approach to EPR.

2018 | 2017 | page top

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Nuclear Law Bulletin No. 99 - Volume 1/2017
English, published: 12/12/17
NEA#7366
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/law/nlb/nlb99.pdf

Other language(s):
- Français: Bulletin de droit nucléaire n°99 – Volume 1/2017 
The Nuclear Law Bulletin is a unique international publication for both professionals and academics in the field of nuclear law. It provides readers with authoritative and comprehensive information on nuclear law developments. Published free online twice a year in both English and French, it features topical articles written by renowned legal experts, covers legislative developments worldwide and reports on relevant case law, bilateral and international agreements as well as regulatory activities of international organisations.

Feature articles in this issue include: "Reformed and reforming: Adapting the licensing process to meet new challenges"; "Reflections on the development of international nuclear law"; and "Facing the challenge of nuclear mass tort processing".
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Nuclear Energy Data 2017
English, published: 11/20/17
NEA#7365
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/ndd/pubs/2017/7365-ned-2017.pdf
Nuclear Energy Data -- 2017
Nuclear Energy Data is the Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports
documenting nuclear power status in NEA member countries and in the OECD area. Information provided
by governments includes statistics on total electricity produced by all sources and by nuclear power, fuel
cycle capacities and requirements, and projections to 2035, where available. Country reports summarise
energy policies, updates of the status in nuclear energy programmes and fuel cycle developments. In
2016, nuclear power continued to supply significant amounts of low-carbon baseload electricity, despite
strong competition from low-cost fossil fuels and subsidised renewable energy sources. Three new units
were connected to the grid in 2016, in Korea, Russia and the United States. In Japan, an additional three
reactors returned to operation in 2016, bringing the total to five under the new regulatory regime. Three
reactors were officially shut down in 2016 -- one in Japan, one in Russia and one in the United States.
Governments committed to having nuclear power in the energy mix advanced plans for developing or
increasing nuclear generating capacity, with the preparation of new build projects making progress in
Finland, Hungary, Turkey and the United Kingdom. Further details on these and other developments are
provided in the publication's numerous tables, graphs and country reports.
This publication contains "StatLinks". For each StatLink, the reader will find a URL which leads to the
corresponding spreadsheet. These links work in the same way as an Internet link.

Donnees sur l'energie nucleaire -- 2017
Les Donnees sur l'energie nucleaire, compilation annuelle de statistiques et de rapports nationaux de
l'Agence de l'OCDE pour l'energie nucleaire, presentent la situation de l'energie nucleaire dans les pays
membres de l'AEN et dans la zone de l'OCDE. Les informations communiquees par les gouvernements
comprennent des statistiques sur la production d'electricite totale et nucleaire, les capacites et les besoins
du cycle du combustible et, lorsqu'elles sont disponibles, des projections jusqu'en 2035. Les rapports
nationaux presentent brievement les politiques energetiques et les evolutions du cycle du combustible.
En 2016, l'electronucleaire a continue de generer des quantites importantes d'electricite en base faiblement
carbonee, et ce en depit de la forte concurrence des combustibles fossiles bon marche et des energies
renouvelable subventionnees. Cette meme annee, trois nouveaux reacteurs ont ete raccordes au reseau
en Coree, aux Etats-Unis et en Russie. Au Japon, trois reacteurs ont ete redemarres, ce qui porte a cinq
le nombre de tranches en exploitation repondant a la nouvelle reglementation en vigueur. Trois reacteurs
ont ete officiellement mis hors service en 2016 -- un aux Etats-Unis, un au Japon et un en Russie. Les pays
decides a inclure le nucleaire dans leur bouquet energetique ont poursuivi leurs projets de developpement
ou d'augmentation de la puissance nucleaire installee. Ainsi, les projets de construction en Finlande, en
Hongrie, au Royaume-Uni et en Turquie ont progresse. Le lecteur trouvera de plus amples informations sur
ces evolutions et d'autres developpements dans les nombreux tableaux, graphiques et rapports nationaux
que contient cet ouvrage.
Cette publication contient des "StatLinks". Fonctionnant comme un lien internet, un StatLink fournit
l'acces a la feuille de calcul correspondante.
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Radiological Characterisation from a Materials and Waste End-State Perspective – Experience from Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities
English, 95 pages, published: 11/02/17
NEA#7373
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/rwm/pubs/2017/7373-rad-char-pers.pdf
Radiological characterisation is a key enabling activity for the planning and
implementation of nuclear facility decommissioning. Effective characterisation allows
the extent, location and nature of contamination to be determined and provides
crucial information for facility dismantling, the management of material and waste
arisings, the protection of workers, the public and the environment, and associated
cost estimations.
This report will be useful for characterisation practitioners who carry out tactical
planning, preparation, optimisation and implementation of characterisation to support
the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and the management of associated materials
and waste. It compiles recent experience from NEA member countries in radiological
characterisation, including from international experts, international case studies,
an international conference, and international standards and guidance. Using this
comprehensive evidence base, the report identifies relevant good practice and provides
practical advice covering all stages of the characterisation process.