Recent Publications


List of titles sorted by date
National Inventories and Management Strategies for Spent Nuclear Fuel and Radioactive Waste (2017)
Extended Methodology for the Common Presentation of Data
Recycling and Reuse of Materials Arising from the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities (2017)
A Report by the NEA Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning
International Conference on Geological Repositories (2017)
Conference Synthesis, 7-9 December 2016, Paris, France

Detailed publication list

2017 | 2016 | page top

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National Inventories and Management Strategies for Spent Nuclear Fuel and Radioactive Waste
Extended Methodology for the Common Presentation of Data
English, 70 pages, published: 08/28/17
NEA#7371
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/rwm/pubs/2017/7371-spent-fuel-strategies.pdf
Radioactive waste inventory data are an important element in the development of a national radioactive waste management programme since these data affect the design and selection of the ultimate disposal methods. Inventory data are generally presented as an amount of radioactive waste under various waste classes, according to the waste classification scheme developed and adopted by the country or national programme in question. Various waste classification schemes have evolved in most countries, and these schemes classify radioactive waste according to its origin, to criteria related to the protection of workers or to the physical, chemical and radiological properties of the waste and the planned disposal method(s).

The diversity in classification schemes across countries has restricted the possibility of comparing waste inventories and led to difficulties in interpreting waste management practices, both nationally and internationally. To help improve this situation, the Nuclear Energy Agency developed a methodology that ensures consistency of national radioactive waste and spent fuel inventory data when presenting them in a common scheme in direct connection with accepted management strategy and disposal routes. This report is a follow up to the 2016 report that introduced the methodology and presenting scheme for spent fuel, and it now extends this methodology and presenting scheme to all types of radioactive waste and corresponding management strategies.
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Recycling and Reuse of Materials Arising from the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities
A Report by the NEA Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning
English, 69 pages, published: 08/16/17
NEA#7310
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/rwm/pubs/2017/7310-recycle-decom.pdf
Large quantities of materials arising from the decommissioning of nuclear facilities are non-radioactive per se. An additional significant share of materials is of very low-level or low-level radioactivity and can, after having undergone treatment and a clearance process, be recycled and reused in a restricted or unrestricted way. Recycle and reuse options today provide valuable solutions to minimise radioactive waste from decommissioning and at the same time maximise the recovery of valuable materials. The NEA Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning (CPD) prepared this overview on the various approaches being undertaken by international and national organisations for the management of slightly contaminated material resulting from activities in the nuclear sector. The report draws on CPD member organisations’ experiences and practices related to recycling and reuse, which were gathered through an international survey. It provides information on improvements and changes in technologies, methodologies and regulations since the 1996 report on this subject, with the conclusions and recommendations taking into account 20 years of additional experience that will be useful for current and future practitioners. Case studies are provided to illustrate significant points of interest, for example in relation to scrap metals, concrete and soil.
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NEA News Vol. 35.1
English, 31 pages, published: 08/04/17
NEA#7347
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/nea-news/2017/35-1/nea-news-35-1.pdf
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Rapport annuel 2016 de l'AEN
Français, published: 05/29/17
NEA#7350
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/pub/activities/ar2016/ar2016-fr.pdf

Other language(s):
- English: NEA Annual Report 2016
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NEA Annual Report 2016
English, 68 pages, published: 04/19/17
NEA#7349
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/pub/activities/ar2016/ar2016.pdf

Other language(s):
- Français: Rapport annuel 2016 de l'AEN
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International Conference on Geological Repositories
Conference Synthesis, 7-9 December 2016, Paris, France
English, 40 pages, published: 04/04/17
NEA#7345
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/rwm/pubs/2017/7345-icgr2016-synthesis.pdf
Worldwide consensus exists within the international community that geological repositories can provide the necessary long-term safety and security to isolate long-lived radioactive waste from the human environment over long timescales. Such repositories are also feasible to construct using current technologies. However, proving the technical merits and safety of repositories, while satisfying societal and political requirements, has been a challenge in many countries.

Building upon the success of previous conferences held in Denver (1999), Stockholm (2003), Berne (2007) and Toronto (2012), the ICGR 2016 brought together high-level decision makers from regulatory and local government bodies, waste management organisations and public stakeholder communities to review current perspectives of geological repository development. This publication provides a synthesis of the 2016 conference on continued engagement and safe implementation of repositories, which was designed to promote information and experience sharing, particularly in the development of polices and regulatory frameworks. Repository safety, and the planning and implementation of repository programmes with societal involvement, as well as ongoing work within different international organisations, were also addressed at the conference.

2017 | 2016 | page top

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International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhe Project)
English, published: 04/28/17
NEA#7329
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/science/wpncs/icsbep/handbook.html
The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation (IRPhE) Project was initiated as a pilot in 1999 by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). The project was endorsed as an official activity of the NSC in June 2003. While the NEA co-ordinates and administers the IRPhE Project at the international level, each participating country is responsible for the administration, technical direction and priorities of the project within their respective countries. The information and data included in this handbook are available to NEA member countries, contributors and to others on a case-by-case basis.

This handbook contains reactor physics benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments performed at nuclear facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by reactor designers, safety analysts and nuclear data evaluators to validate calculation techniques and data. Example calculations are presented; these do not constitute a validation or endorsement of the codes or cross-section data.

The 2016 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments contains data from 151 experimental series that were performed at 50 reactor facilities. To be published as approved benchmarks, the experiments must be evaluated against agreed technical criteria and reviewed by the IRPhE Technical Review Group. A total of 146 of the 151 evaluations are published as approved benchmarks. The remaining five evaluations are published as draft documents only.

New to the handbook is the evaluation of the CERES Phase II validation of fission product poisoning through reactivity worth measurements, which includes 13 fission products. The front cover of this year’s handbook shows the MINERVE reactor used to obtain the results.
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Impacts of the Fukushima Daiichi Accident on Nuclear Development Policies
English, 68 pages, published: 04/06/17
NEA#7212
Available online at: http://www.oecd-nea.org/ndd/pubs/2017/7212-impacts-fukushima-policies.pdf
The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident has had an impact on the development of nuclear power around the world. While the accident was followed by thorough technical assessments of the safety of all operating nuclear power plants, and a general increase in safety requirements has been observed worldwide, national policy responses have been more varied. These responses have ranged from countries phasing out or accelerating decisions to phase out nuclear energy to countries reducing their reliance on nuclear power or on the contrary continuing to pursue or expand their nuclear power programmes.

This study examines changes to policies, and plans and attempts to distinguish the impact of the Fukushima Daiichi accident from other factors that have affected policymaking in relation to nuclear energy, in particular electricity market economics, financing challenges and competition from other sources (gas, coal and renewables). It also examines changes over time to long-term, quantitative country projections, which reveal interesting trends on the possible role of nuclear energy in future energy systems.